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JOURNALS || ASIO Journal of Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics & Applied Sciences (ASIO-JCPMAS) [ISSN: 2455-7064 ]
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ INTEREST IN MATHEMATICS IN GHANA – A LOGISTIC REGRESSION ANALYSIS APPROACH

Author Names : Yarhands Dissou Arthur
Page No. : 01-06  volume 2 issue 1
Article Overview

ARTICLE DESCRIPTION: 

Yarhands Dissou Arthur, Samuel Asiedu Addo, Charles K. Assuah, SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS’ INTEREST IN MATHEMATICS IN GHANA – A LOGISTIC REGRESSION ANALYSIS APPROACH, ASIO Journal of Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics & Applied Sciences (ASIO-JCPMAS), 2017, 2(1): 01-06.

ARTICLE TYPE: Research

Doi: 10.2016-28457823; DOI Link :: http://doi-ds.org/doilink/06.2017-21547888/


ABSTRACT:  

The role of parent and teachers in building students interest in mathematics is enormous but this has not been investigated empirically in Ghana. The study explores the significance of gender, basic school attended, compulsion, career influence, discouragement and fear imposed by mathematics teachers as well as students’ mathematics interest rating on students’ interest in mathematics. The study uses logistic regression analysis to predict students’ interest in mathematics. With interest in mathematics as response variables, eight predictor variables were used. The study indicated that the predictor variables predicted student interest significantly, x(7,N=1096)=429.742,p<0.001. The study further revealed that the predictor variables can explain 49.3% of the total variability in the students’ interest in mathematics, however, the overall correct prediction success rate was 96.1% .The Wald test further informed the study by indicating the gender and the type of basic school attended not statistically significant. The study concluded that, the gender and the type of basic school attended does not significantly predict students’ mathematics interest, however, factors like compulsion, discouragement and fear imposed by teachers; students’ and interest rating significantly influenced student interest in mathematics. 

Keywords:  Ghana, Logistic Regression, Mathematics Education, Student Interest.   

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